10 November

Pick a Day

10 NOVEMBER

In Music History

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2013 At the MTV Europe Awards, Miley Cyrus smokes a joint while accepting her Best Video award for "Wrecking Ball." The ceremony is held in Amsterdam, so it's legal.

2012 No longer an item: Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez. The pair announce their break-up after dating for about a year.

Bieber plays an acoustic version of "Cry Me A River" at his show in Boston. A decade earlier, Justin Timberlake wrote the song about his split with Britney Spears.

2006 R&B singer-songwriter Gerald Levert, age 40, dies of acute intoxication after taking various prescription painkillers combined with Xanax and antihistamines. The death is ruled accidental.

2003 The paperback version of Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain's Journals is released, sparking renewed interest in the dead rock star. A disorganized collection of his writings and drawings, the front cover warns, "if you read, you'll judge."

2003 An emotional tribute to the recently deceased Johnny Cash is held at Nashville's famous Ryman Auditorium, featuring classic Cash songs performed by Sheryl Crow, Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson, Kid Rock, and Steve Earle, among others.

2003 David Bowie is forced to cancel the remainder of his gig in Nice, France, when laryngitis causes his voice to give out in the middle of "Ziggy Stardust." Doctors assign Bowie three days rest.

2002 Johnny Griffith dies of a heart attack at age 66. As a keyboardist for Motown's in-house band, The Funk Brothers, he played on several of the label's hits, including "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" and "Stop! In the Name of Love."

2001 Country singer Chalee Tennison and guitarist Mark Gillespie marry following a three-year courtship. The marriage is Tennison's fourth and Gillespie's first.

2000 Singer-songwriter Billy Yates makes his Grand Ole Opry debut, performing his single "What Do You Want From Me Now."

1998 On their way to perform at the 1998 MTV Europe Music Awards at Milan's Fila Forum, British girl group All Saints are held up for six hours in London by a walkout of Milan airport employees.

1997 Hollywood session guitarist Tommy Tedesco dies of lung cancer at age 67. Aside from playing on classic TV themes such as The Twilight Zone, Batman, and M*A*S*H, he recorded with a number of artists, including Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, The Beach Boys, and Elvis Presley.

1994 Jazz singer Carmen McRae dies at age 72, a month after suffering a stroke.

1994 Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page and Robert Plant perform an all-acoustic version of "Stairway To Heaven" while visiting a Japanese talk show.

1990 Ronnie Dyson dies of heart failure at age 40. The stage actor, known for his lead vocal on the Hair theme "Aquarius," launched his recording career with the Top 10 hit "(If You Let Me Make Love to You Then) Why Can't I Touch You?" in 1970.

1990 In a sign that pop and rap have fused together, To the Extreme by Vanilla Ice replaces MC Hammer's Please Hammer, Don't Hurt 'Em at #1 on the US albums chart.

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Sesame Street Debuts

1969

Sesame Street debuts on American public television. Many of the lessons are taught with songs, and in later seasons, musicians drop by to help out: Stevie Wonder, James Taylor, Ray Charles, Dixie Chicks and Alicia Keys are among the many to appear on the show. The two big names that turn down offers: Bruce Springsteen and Barbra Streisand.

The first episode rolls out to the iconic theme song "Can You Tell Me How to Get to Sesame Street," a jaunty tune featuring jazz harmonica player Toots Thielemans with sunny lyrics sung by a children's choir. Written by composer Joe Raposo along with lyricist Bruce Hart and show producer Jon Stone, the theme is the first of many classic songs from the program. Sesame Street is a magical destination for children and adults alike, where a diverse cast of friendly humans and colorful Muppets meet to share life lessons, often through music. Kermit the Frog learns to accept his greenness even though "It's Not Easy Bein' Green." The Cookie Monster embraces the alphabet with "C Is For Cookie." Ernie, Bert's Pal, makes bath time fun with "Rubber Duckie" - and splashes onto the Hot 100 at #16. In this debut episode, we learn all about dairy farms with "Hey Cow, I See You Now."

Bob Johnson, played by Bob McGrath, is the Street's resident music teacher, who invites many real-life performers to join in the fun. Starting in 1970 Buffy Sainte-Marie, an Aboriginal Canadian folk singer, teaches kids about her culture, namely that "Indians exist, present tense, and we're not all stuck in museums like the dinosaurs, which is what I grew up with." She's also the first person to ever breastfeed on television, in a segment demonstrating sibling rivalry, as Big Bird is jealous over the attention pal Buffy is giving to her new baby. Over the years, guests sing their hit songs tweaked for a preschool audience: Stevie Wonder sings "Superstition" and teaches Grover how to scat, Billy Joel sings "Just The Way You Are" to Oscar the Grouch, and Hootie & The Blowfish turn "Hold My Hand" into a lesson about crossing the street safely.

Sesame Street, created by Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett, is the first program to use laboratory and formative research to create curriculum-based content aimed at children. Disadvantaged kids are a primary concern from the beginning, and the fictional street is modeled after a gritty inner-city stretch lined with rowhouses and littered with garbage cans – as gritty as a kids show can realistically muster. By the '70s, one-third of all American toddlers watch the program. By 1996, 95% of the nation's preschoolers tune in by the time they turn three, and the show's star Muppet, Elmo, incites a nationwide craze with the release of the Tickle Me Elmo doll. A 2015 study by the University of Maryland suggests that watching Sesame Street can be just as beneficial as attending preschool. Musically, the show takes home eight Grammy Awards by 2014, a record number for a children's show.

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